Welcome

The current list of confirmed Speakers includes:

*** Angelo Arleo *** Matthew Cook *** Tobi Delbruck *** Marc-Oliver Gewaltig *** Jeffrey L. Krichmar *** Thomas Mergner *** Jun Morimoto *** Johannes Schemmel *** Terry Stewart *** Steve Temple ***

NeuroEngineering the Brain:
from Neuroscience to Robotics … and back

Jointly organized by:
Institute for Neuroscientific System Theory (Prof. Jörg Conradt)
Institute for Cognitive Systems (Prof. Gordon Cheng)

Engineering and neuroscience have a long history of successful collaborations. Various examples convincingly show that neuro‐inspired approaches not just yield higher performance but also more natural behavior of technical systems compared to conventional engineering approaches. Vice‐versa the field of neuroscience can benefit from bio‐inspired technical systems by inferring insights from such systems’ behaviors (e.g. human‐robot interaction). However, up to date most such projects have not yet left the domain of proof‐of‐concept. Despite the tremendous progress in neuroscientific understanding of higher brain functionality made in the last decade, none of our models have yet made it into everyday technical systems. Physiologists and neural modelers know well how to employ technological resources; but engineering research groups often see neuroscience as loose inspiration at the most.

In recent years, however, computers have made tremendous progress in terms of raw computing power and complexity, and various “neuro‐customized” hardware computing systems have been developed ‐ which together allow significantly more realistic neuronal models to run in real‐time. These systems thereby offer radically new “unconventional” computing options for engineers and especially for research in real‐time robotics in closed‐loop perception, cognition and action systems. The robotics community often is unaware of this recent progress and potential benefits.

The workshop on “NeuroEngineering the Brain: from Neuroscience to Robotics … and back” brings together researchers in the border areas between computational neuroscience and systems engineering with a focus on robotics, to discuss currently available neuromorphic computing systems applicable in upcoming robotics systems.

Expected outcome of this workshop is twofold:

  • Increasing the visibility of realistic large scale neural simulations in conjunction with closed‐loop robotic systems, which provide adequate realworld stimuli, and
  • Transferring computational neuro‐technology (algorithms and hardware) into the robotics research community, and finally as products into the massmarket.

 

During the workshop we will provide ample time for breakout sessions, brainstorming discussions, and live demonstrations of robotic systems.

Download-links:
Official workshop flyer for screen display
Official workshop flyer for printing A4 double sided
Official workshop poster